CIG Scotland AGM 2018

The Cataloguing & Indexing Group in Scotland warmly invites you to its 2018 Annual General Meeting, which will take place at Kelvin Hall in Glasgow on Friday 17th August, 2018.

Interested parties can contribute to the agenda by contacting CIGS Secretary, Eilidh MacGlone at cigscot@gmail.com.

Find out more information about the event and book your place through Eventbrite: CIG Scotland AGM 2018

When and Where

  • Date: Friday 17th August, 2018
  • Time: AGM will start at 1:30
  • Venue: Activity Space, Kelvin Hall, 1445 Argyle Street, Glasgow, G3 8AW

See you all in August.

Cataloguing and Indexing Group in Scotland

 

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Catalogue & Index: Call for papers (Issue 192) – Indexing

The theme for the September issue is indexing; this may be something that comes within the remit of your cataloguing role, or you may be a professional indexer.  The term covers several areas of expertise that we would be interested in hearing about.

  • Subject indexing – controlled vocabularies, subject headings e.g. (LCSH, MeSH, FAST), discussing challenges of multilingual subject access, specificity, machine indexing, subject analysis, social tagging and folksonomy, purpose of indexing
  • Book indexing – introduction to the profession, indexing practice, effect of automation and software, ebook indexing, future of the profession, technicalities, standards
  • Database indexing – what it encompasses, linked to subject or book indexing

We are seeking articles on these or any other topics broadly related to indexing.

Please contact the editors with any proposed papers and we will reply with further information:

Karen Pierce: PierceKF@Cardiff.ac.uk

Deborah Lee: Deborah.Lee@courtauld.ac.uk)

Please also contact the editors if you have any queries, or if you want to offer a paper that does not fit into the theme mentioned.  We are always happy to consider papers on topics unrelated to an issue’s theme, especially if it is the result of some research you have conducted, or a project you have been involved in.

Papers can be up to 2,000 words, and we are happy to include a selection of images; papers for this issue will be due on 31st August.

Please check our guidance for contributors: https://archive.cilip.org.uk/cataloguing-indexing-group/catalogue-index/guidance-contributors

Library Juice Academy classification course: a report by Anna Hughes

I recently received a bursary from CILIP’s Cataloguing & Indexing Group to complete a four week Dewey decimal classification course run by Library Juice. I saw this opportunity advertised on the CIG blog (via Twitter).  As well as being used at most academic libraries in the United Kingdom, the Dewey decimal classification system is common in publicImage 1 libraries too. While my cataloguing role at The University of Manchester Library (UML) involves copy cataloguing shelf-ready items to DD23, I am not involved with the classification of the new material passing through the department. The online course aimed not only to expose novices to the steps necessary to assign classification and build Dewey numbers using Web Dewey, but to give them a solid foundation in the creation and interpretation of Dewey decimal classification numbers as well. For those (like me) who are more used to copy cataloguing Dewey numbers, this was an opportunity to understand the methods used to build the classification numbers from scratch.

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This course consisted of lessons and practical exercises to give participants experience with classifying various types of resources. There were also group discussions which were extremely useful when you had a classification quandary, which given the subjective nature of classification, was pretty regularly! Each week’s content was posted on a Sunday night with a week to read through the subject matter and complete the assignments and exercises. Deadlines were not strict though which meant that the course could work around my job which was perfect.

So what have I gained from taking this course? I hadn’t realised how complicated the Dewey decimal classification system is! Although I already had a basic familiarity with the system thanks to my PG.Dip in Library & Information Management, and from copy cataloguing in my day to day role, elements of classification such as using the Dewey decimal classification tables to add Image 3depth to classification numbers took me way out of my comfort zone. However, this course gave me an understanding of how and why material is classified where it is and enabled me to develop in-depth classification numbers using building blocks. Although classification at UML is made more complicated by the fact that we classify material to a range of Dewey decimal, dependant on the subject matter, thanks to CILIP and CIG, hopefully, I’ll be able to put what I’ve learned into action soon.

 

 

Catalogue & Index Issue 190

The theme of the latest issue is research: what it is, how to do it, what resources to use, how to promote what you have done, and examples of it.

Research is as popular as it has ever been and we hope through this issue to answer some of your questions or inspire you to engage with research even more.

Access the full articles through our dedicated page within CILIP’s platform: Catalogue and Index: Issue 190